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The Fitness Zone

4 Tips for Personal Trainers to Improve their Client Training Cues
March 5, 2014

Every good Personal Trainer knows the value of using the right word or phrase to help his or her client in a moment. Using cues is an essential skill that makes a big difference in the life of a Trainer. Not only do these verbal indications improve clients' movements, but they can also help them to better understand the exercises in the long-term. To help you figure out the right cues, Personal Trainer Jarred English shared some of his best tips.

1. Focus On the Important Things

Movements are complicated, and even more so if your client starts over thinking it. If they are having trouble performing a specific exercise, just give them one or two things to focus on, in order to get the basics right first.

2. Mix It Up

Different cues work for different people. If your client is still struggling after you say something like "Drive your hips back," then try a variation on it. Eric Cressey tells clients to "imagine I have a rope around your hips and pull you back."

3. Internal Vs. External

Just another part of mixing it up, using an external cue such as "push the floor away," is often more effective than its internal equivalent of "push your feet through the floor."

4. Take It Down a Step

No matter what your training style, some clients will simply not be ready for certain movements. When this happens, simply drop it down a level and ask them to perform a more basic movement.

This content is not intended to be used as individual health or fitness advice divorced from that imparted by medical, health or fitness professionals. Medical clearance should always be sought before commencing an exercise regime. The Institute and the authors do no take any responsibility for accident or injury caused as a result of this information.

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